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Posts tagged ‘bacteria’

Not All Microorganisms are Bad for the Human Body

Not All Microorganisms are Bad for the Human Body

By Clifford Woods

Not All Microorganisms are Bad for the Human BodyOur bodies are a host to numerous microorganisms, which are helpful, and occasionally required for individual well-being, known as commensal microorganisms. These types of beneficial bacteria tend to be disregarded because of the unwanted effects related to various other microbial varieties, along with the issues related to their overgrowth.

An ordinary healthy individual has microorganisms residing in their intestinal tract, on the pores and skin, as well as in their food, which they consume.

A variety of microbial varieties reside on or within human beings, participating in functions that are beneficial to the performance of the body’s systems. On the other hand, these kinds of microorganisms need to be maintained in order to stay away from contamination. However, they also have to be maintained in order to avoid non-beneficial microorganisms from seizing residence.

Intestinal Tract Bacteria: One of the most popular microorganisms in the intestinal tract is Lactobacillus acidophilus, which helps with the digestion of lactose, the break down of vitamins, conversion process of soluble fiber, reusing of proteins, and release of harmful toxins. The byproducts of acidophilus digestive functions produce an acidic atmosphere, which often keeps out far more harmful microorganisms like fungus and harmful bacteria.

An additional comparable microorganism is Streptococcus mutants. This particular bacterium exists within the mouth and transforms the sugar sucrose into lactic. Though this type of microorganism is regarded as useful, it may trigger teeth plaque and teeth corrosion if your dental cleanliness is not so good. Much like acidophilus, this microorganism keeps out yeast infections and damaging Streptococcus and Staphylococcus traces.

The bacteria within the intestinal tract additionally assist in creating a strong immune system; over fifty percent of the human body’s immune system tissue is found in the lining of the small intestinal tract. The microorganisms are released from your body on a daily basis and restored without leading to illness.

Epidermis Microbes: Propionibacterium acne and Staphylococcus epidermis are a couple of microbial species that are usually found on the pores and skin. Propionibacterium acne reside off essential fatty acids as well as the natural oils released from the follicles of the skin. Staphylococcus epidermis is usually not harmful, with the exception of the situation where individuals have a diminished defense system or permanent catheters.

Both of these microorganism types may cause contamination, acne breakouts, or oral plaques if they are not kept under control; however they also keep out more harmful form of microorganisms. Getting rid of these types of colonizing varieties completely would leave an individual susceptible to more serious bacterial infections.

Staphylococcus aureus can also be located on the pores and skin of some individuals, though more frequently within the nasal area, yet will not result in illness except when there exists a crack in the skin that it could enter in.

Probiotics: Men and women take in air and consume harmful microorganisms each and every day. Without the presence of regular oral and intestinal tract bacteria, illness would be a great deal more frequent and extreme. Medication essentially results in the depletion of the intestinal tract bacteria, which can leave an individual vulnerable to additional bacterial infections. This also happens when conventional medical creams or ointments are utilized excessively on your skin.

However the total consequences are still not yet recognized. To reverse the consequences of antibiotics and contamination within the bacteria of your body, probiotics came into use in the 1990s. Microorganisms are being put into food items such as natural yogurt, which is on its own a live microorganism environment. These bacterial cultures in yogurt are anticipated to assist in immune system reactions and digestive function.
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Clifford WoodsClifford Woods is the CEO of Effective Environmental Services and Organic Environmental Technology
We brew Beneficial Microorganisms that eat toxins and offer Natural Organic Solutions.

Beneficial Microorganisms and the Environment

Beneficial Microorganisms and the Environment

By Clifford Woods

beneficial microorganisms and the environmentOur culture has become obsessed with eliminating bacteria; using gels and wipes to kill all the microbes that we have associated with illness, infection and death. But there are many types of microbes that are beneficial, which are helpful, even helping us in our fight against global warming by breaking down plastics and cleaning up pollution. Someday perhaps even developing into a cure for cancer.

Beneficial Microorganisms: Bacteria or microbes are everywhere in our world, and their presence of course has an effect on the environment they are living in. These effects of microbes on our environment may be beneficial or harmful, with some having no effect on humans at all.

Beneficial Applications: Outside the body, microorganisms are used widely in various applications that are beneficial, including pest control, food, as well as symbiosis of plants and stimulation of growth.

Oil Spills: There are assorted types of bacteria that can clean up the environment when major petroleum spills happen. There is a specific strain of bacteria called Alcanivorax that will quickly increase in population whenever an oil spill offers for them, large amounts of food, and they are able to remove much of the oil from these spills.

They were at work in the Gulf of Mexico during the Deep Water Horizon spill and are probably still there to help undo the damage that was done to the Gulf. Because they are able to help in this area, they provide an effect that is beneficial to our environment. This incident brought to the attention of scientists even more beneficial microorganisms that feed on oil than originally first thought. It is estimated that the annual seepage in the Gulf of oil is 140,000 tons and these microorganisms take care of that.

Produce Electricity: There are still other forms of bacteria having tiny wire appendages referred to as nano-wires and they not only digest toxic waste including PCBs and chemical solvents, they can also produce electricity while they are digesting the toxic waste. One bacterium, called Shewanella, is a type of microorganism from the deep-sea that grows these nano-wires that seek oxygen when placed in low-oxygen environments.

Experts discovered that when the nano-wires are pricked with electrodes of platinum, they are able to carry a current. If these capabilities are harnessed effectively, they one day could be used in sewage treatment facilities to not only digest waste, but at the same time provide the power for the plant. There is currently no analytic on this form of bacteria.

Bacteria and Plastics: Non-biodegradable and far too present on our planet, plastic becomes a great problem when it comes to disposal. But in 2008, a student in Canada carried out an amazing science experiment where microorganisms were able to eat plastic. Since that time, research teams have been working on the development of this ability and how to use it to our benefit. At the University of Dublin, a professor got these bacteria to metabolize plastic bottles that were cooked down into a new type of plastic that is biodegradable.

On Their Own: In the earlier part of the year, experts discovered that beneficial microorganisms were already breaking down plastics in the world’s oceans on its own, but it has not been shown whether this will have a negative or positive effect on the environment.

Some items such as fishing line as well as plastic bags are being devoured by these bacteria; the problem is that this waste could have potential harmful effects to ecosystems in the ocean as it travels up the food chain.

These are just several different ways that microorganisms are being beneficial to our environment. However, there is a greater need of research in the area.


Clifford WoodsClifford Woods is the CEO of Effective Environmental Services and Organic Environmental Technology
We brew Beneficial Microorganisms that eat toxins and offer Natural Organic products

Fighting Microbes with Microbes | The Scientist Magazine®

Like humans, with their complement of microbes that aid in everything from immune responses to nutrition, plants rely on a vast array of bacteria and fungi for health and defense. Over the last decade, research has revealed many new functional aspects of the crosstalk between human-associated microbes and human cells, but plant biologists are only beginning to scratch the surface of the often surprising ways that soil microbiota impact plants, from underground fungus-wired alarm systems to soil bacteria that can trigger defensive plant behavior or even act as a sort of vaccine. But despite these benefits, microbes are still primarily thought of as harbingers of disease……

Fighting Microbes with Microbes | The Scientist Magazine®.

Beneficial Bacteria: 12 Ways Microbes Help The Environment | WebEcoist

Beneficial Bacteria: 12 Ways Microbes Help The Environment | WebEcoist.

Excellent Read !

 

 

Organic Solutions for Gardens and Plant Pests

Organic Solutions for Garden & Plant Pests

By Clifford Woods

Organic Solutions for Garden & Plant Pests

 

There is a balance in nature that can be tapped into if you want to keep your garden and plants at their best. And when you want to cultivate and maintain an organic garden and naturally healthy plants it is much easier to work with Mother Nature than against her.

Many organic solutions for garden and plant pests are available. Simple, easy to make remedies you can try making yourself and try them out.

 

 

Here is a list of some combination and single mixtures to help in the fight against pests.

  1. Diatomaceous Earth and Chile pepper: Grind up two handfuls of dry chilies into a very fine powder then mix this with 1 cup of Diatomaceous earth. Add to 2 liters of water and let set overnight. Shake well before using.
  2. Chrysanthemum Flower Tea: These flowers hold a powerful plant chemical component called Pyrethrum. This substance invades the nervous system of insects rendering them immobile. You can make your own spray by boiling 100 grams of dried flowers into 1 liter of water. Boil the dried flowers in water for twenty minutes. Strain, cool and place in a spray bottle. This mixture can be stored for up to two months.
  3. Tobacco: Take one cup of organic tobacco (preferably a tobacco that is natural) and mix it in one gallon of water. Leave overnight and after 24-hours it should have a light brown color. Add more water if it too dark. You can use this on most plants, except those belonging to the nightshade family of plants such potato, tomato, eggplant etc.
  4. Salt Spray: This is used on plants that have spider mites. You can mix 2 tablespoons of Himalayan Crystal Salt into one gallon of warm water and spray on infected areas.
  5. Orange Citrus Oil, Water and Soap: Mix together 3 tablespoons of liquid Organic Castile soap with 1 ounce of Orange oil to one gallon of water. Shake well. This is an especially efficient treatment against slugs and can be sprayed directly on ants and roaches also.
  6. Eucalyptus oil: A natural pesticide for flies, bees and wasps. Simply sprinkle a few drops of eucalyptus oil where the insects are found.
  7. Cayenne Pepper Mix or Citrus Oil: This is another excellent organic pesticide that controls ants. Mix 10 drops of citrus essential oil with one tsp. of cayenne pepper and 1 cup of warm water. Shake well and spray.
  8. Mineral oil: This organic pesticide works well for dehydrating insects and their eggs. Mix 10-30 ml of high-grade oil with one liter of water. Stir and add to spray bottle.
  9. Onion and Garlic Spray: Mince one organic clove of garlic and one medium sized organic onion. Add to 1 quart of water. Wait one hour and then add one teaspoon of cayenne pepper and one tablespoon of liquid soap to the mix. This organic spray will hold its potency for one week if stored in the refrigerator.
  10. Neem: A very powerful & natural pesticide and you can make your own Neem oil spray. Simply add 1/2 an ounce of organic Neem oil and ½ teaspoon of a mild organic liquid soap to 2 quarts of warm water. Slowly stir it up and then pour it into a spray bottle and use right away.
  11. Garlic Tea: Make your own garlic spray by boiling a pint of water, throw in roughly chopped garlic cloves and steep until the water is cool. Remove any garlic bits with cheesecloth and then pour into a spray bottle and use.
  12. Basil Tea: Bring 4 cups of water to a boil. Add 1-cup fresh basil. Remove from heat, cover and let cool. Then mix in 1 tsp. of liquid dish detergent. Pour into a spray bottle and use. Basil Tea is good for combating aphids.

Simple-Simple – for both garden and house plants: Mix 1 cup Sunlight dish soap and 1 tbs. of vegetable oil together and then store the liquid in a plastic air tight container. When you need to use it, take 2 teaspoons of this liquid and mix it with 1 quart of water in a spray bottle. Spray top and under the plants leaves and any new shoots and buds. When it is hot, repeat every third day – 3 applications over 7 days. In the cooler weather you only need to use it once a week for 3 weeks.

Organic Solutions for Garden & Plant PestsEmploying organic solutions for garden and plant pest control would go hand in hand with the soil being organic as well. If you have been using store bought chemical fertilizers and are trying to transition out of this method, be patient. Soil goes through both many changes with the transition from a chemical to organic fertilizer is made. It can take the soil quite a while to adjust. Plants can often go through a few stages of poor yields before producing at peak performance.

An easy transition and sure fire method is adding some Beneficial Microorganisms as they are naturally already in the soil. It is just a matter of populating the soil with these beneficial
microbes – they will do the rest.


Clifford Woods is the CEO of Effective Environmental Services and Organic Environmental Technology.
We brew Beneficial Microorganisms that eat toxins and offer Environmentally Friendly Products.

Gardens, Soil and Beneficial Microorganisms

Gardens, Soil and Beneficial Microorganisms

By Clifford Woods

Microorganisms, microbes or bacteria make nutrients available in the soil for plants in a form that the plants then can use. Microbes create some of those nutrients, Mother Nature creates hers and we add the rest.

Some microbes consume nutrients and some microbes eat the microbes that have consumed the nutrients. This in turn breaks the nutrients down into a smaller form so they can be absorbed much more efficiently by the plant.

Gardens, Soil and Beneficial MicroorganismsMicrobes perform different jobs. Some defend against non-beneficial microbes and this helps keep the plant’s natural defence system at it’s best. Some microbes can also convert nitrogen gas in the air into a form that the plants can use.

Microorganisms release different types of proteins, acids, enzymes and other essential elements. These elements help to break down trace minerals, micro and macro-nutrients and make it available as food for the plant. What happens is an extreme increase in root mass, which in turn increases the nutrient intake that creates bigger yields. Enzymes and anti-microbial substances are particularly crucial in plants.

Beneficial microorganisms can also help condition and aerate soil, and create a better drainage system. Some beneficial microorganisms also have the ability to break down toxins in the soil or soil-less mix and turn it into plant food, air and water. They also covert calcium and phosphate into something that plants can actually use.

A good rule of thumb as to which microorganism is beneficial and which is not is the harmful or pathogenic microorganisms cause putrefaction and beneficial microorganisms cause fermentation.

Types of Beneficial Microorganisms:

  • Lactic acid: make lactic acid from sugars or other carbohydrates. This is an important by-product because it can act as a strong fertilizer. It will control or push down non-beneficial or harmful microbes as well as cause rapid decomposition of organic matter and ferments organic matter without the smell and other harmful outcomes.
  • Photosynthetic: these take harmful products like hydrogen sulfide and make them into useful substances. With the help of sunlight, secretions from organic matter can also be made into amino acids, nucleic acids, and bioactive substances. These aid tremendously in the growth of a plant and it’s development. Amino acids are the basic building blocks of proteins. Synthesis of new protein is what Nucleic acids are responsible for and this allows the characteristics of an organism to transfer from one generation to another. Bioactive substances are important in the regulation of the function of both plants and animals, which include hormones, enzymes, and neurotransmitters, among others.
  • Fermenting fungi: these groups of microorganisms suppress bad odors and prevent plant infestation by harmful insects and maggots. They also decompose organic matter rapidly to produce alcohol, esters and anti-microbial substances.
  • Yeasts: these create a better root system and helps with the absorption of more water and nutrients from the soil. This will in turn speed up plant growth, producing more and wider leaves so the plant will produce starch. Plants use glucose as energy; but starch can be stored more efficiently and for longer periods of time.Plants use the sun for energy so at night the plants convert the stored starch back to glucose to provide the basic energy needed to maintain basic cellular functions.

If you want to keep the populations of beneficial microorganisms healthy here is what you don’t do.

  1. Do not use chemical fertilizers: fertilizers are made up of salts, and salts suck the water out of the microbes, which will either kill them or cause them to go into a dormant state.
  2. Do not use hydrogen peroxide (H2O2): H2O2 adds oxygen to water, lowers algae levels and can help suppress diseases within plants. It helps sterilize water and the growing medium to kill harmful microorganisms, but it will also kill the beneficial microorganisms. Not good.
  3. Do not use chemical pesticides: these get sprayed onto leaves to kill harmful insects, but they also kill the beneficial microbes that are present on the leaves. The pesticides then drip off the leaves and into the soil and again, kill any beneficial microbes present in that soil or soil-less mix.
  4. Don’t walk on the soil or compact it: over-tilling and compaction can kill some beneficial microbe populations since some microbes need air to survive. Worms can do the work of turning it in for you.

Do add at least an inch of organic compost a year:  this will replenish the nutrients that the plants have used that season and handle pests with natural and organic remedies.

Beneficial microorganisms bring back the lost properties of the soil and are commonly used in natural farming and organic gardens.


Clifford Woods is the CEO of Effective Environmental Services and Organic Environmental Technology.
We brew Beneficial Microorganisms that eat toxins and offer Environmentally Friendly Products.

Organic Help for Ranchers

Organic Help for Ranchers

By Clifford Woods

In the industry of beef production, especially in the United States, organic ranches are the exceptions. While the majority of ranchers truck calves off to feed lots to be plumped up on grain that is supplemented with all types of nutritional enhancements, there is a new breed of ranchers. This new ranchers keep their young calves close to home, allowing them to spend the final months prior to slaughter grazing on the green grass of their own ranches.

One of the leaders of this “alternative” ranching movement is the Lasater family who own an organic ranch in Colorado. It is at their ranch where it is being proven that it is possible to nurture high quality beef that is organic using procedures that many of the researchers say are not only better for the environment, but also healthier for people who eat beef. However, sceptics don’t believe that these methods will be able to supply enough beef to consumers, while others credit ranchers like Lasater’s with showing the benefits of the movement for “grass-fed” or organic ranching.

Generations ago, all cattle being raised for beef were grass-fed; spending their complete lives grazing on organic ranch lands or prairies. These days, beef calves normally pass the last few months of life in huge feed-lots, where there is hardly any room to move away from fattening up on special feed as well as drugs to ward off disease. Producers in the mainstream of this industry say that these methods have guaranteed a stable, sensibly priced, stream of beef being trucked to grocery stores and into the refrigerators of consumers.

On the other hand, there are critics who say cheap beef has come at the expense of safe beef. These critics debate that modern methods have had dangerous outcomes, for instance, the spreading of food-borne illnesses that are caused by bacteria resistant to the huge amount of drugs that are given to cattle at feed-lots, and deadly “mad cow disease,” a neurological disease that is fatal, caused by consuming contaminated beef.

Scientists theorize that mad cow is spread by giving cattle food in feed lots that include bone meal and spinal cord or brain tissue from cows that are diseased (a practice that is banned in the United States and other industrial nations).

Organic Rancher's HelperOrganic help for ranchers is what the experts look to for when combating such issues.

To avoid such problems, present-day awareness and educated ranchers feed their cattle only pasture grass, hay, and legumes. Though a significant proportion of masses still believe inorganic beef production cannot be of much of a problem to them, the reality of this being totally opposite is true, however.

Microorganisms, such as fungi, bacteria and viruses are considered to be problems by ranchers due to destruction to crops and animals, but actually there are beneficial microorganisms. Fungi and bacteria in the soil are important for decaying of organic matter and recycling old plant components. Moreover, some of these soil fungi and bacteria form relationships with the roots of plants, providing essential nutrients, such as phosphorus and nitrogen.

Also, by fungi colonizing upper areas of plants, they provide organic help for ranchers and their crops, helping their crops to be more tolerant to drought, more resistance to insects, have more heat tolerance and also more resistance to plant diseases. All of this without having to spray these crops with any harsh chemical products.

Most beneficial is the tolerance to drought and heat. Many areas of the country are in the middle of the worst drought and record heat not seen in decades with experts saying it is part of global warming and is not going to get better any sooner.

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Clifford Woods is the CEO of Effective Environmental Services and Organic Environmental Technology.

Find out more about our organic product: Rancher’s Helper

We brew Beneficial Microorganisms that eat toxins and offer Environmentally Friendly Products

Organic Septic Tank Cleaners

Organic Septic Tank Cleaners

By Clifford Woods

Having a septic tank is one of the best and healthiest ways to get rid of the waste water from your home. Having a good septic tank cleaner is really important so that you can actually maintain the life and working order of your tank.

Now there are hard-core septic cleaners, which could potentially be dangerous because of their chemicals. So the safest way that you can go is by taking care of your septic tank system the all-natural and organic way. This will not only ensure the life of your system but it will also ensure that your soil, ground and family stay as healthy as they can.

The first rule of organic septic cleaning is actually getting your tank pumped out regularly. You want to ensure that you pump out all of the sludge and slime and other things that clog up your tank and prevent the anaerobic bacteria from doing its job and breaking down the solid waste that is washed out with the waste-water.

It has been determined that if your home does not have a garbage disposal then the rule of thumb is to get it pumped out once every 3 years. If your home does have a garbage disposal then you should get it pumped out every single year without exception.

Organic Septic Tank CleanersThe next thing is the organic septic tank cleaners, which have to do with adding biological additives including things like yeast products, natural bacteria and then enzymes.

You want to find products, which show that they are organic and that they will be safe for the ground water and soil around the tank that you are using. If you do not see this on the packaging then stay away from it because it could end up making people sick in the home, or even neighbors, because it could contaminate the ground water with chemicals and other non-organic substances.

You also want to make sure that with the addition of the organic cleaner that you also tend to your leaching field as well. It’s an essential part of your septic system and needs to be treated well to maintain that end of the system.

You will want to plant tall grasses or things like that over the field so that you will have absorption beds for the waste-water. You do not want to plant trees or plants with heavy deep root systems because this could actually cause damage to your system and that is a very costly expense to get fixed.

With any septic tank cleaners, make sure as it was mentioned before that everything you put into it is all natural, biodegradable and safe for the environment. You want to ensure that for generations to come that you are being a responsible home owner and doing your part to ensure the life of your septic tank system.

Make sure that you are caring for the soil and ground water around your home as well because if that becomes contaminated, then it could take a very long time to clean up and it can be expensive as well.

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Clifford Woods is the CEO of Effective Environmental Services and Organic Environmental Technology.

Find out more about our Organic Septic Tank Cleaner

We brew Beneficial Microorganisms that eat toxins  and offer Environmentally Friendly Products.

Tips for Keeping a Clean Pond All Year Round

Tips for Keeping a Clean Pond All Year Round

By Clifford Woods

You have done all the work to create your beautiful pond. You’ve got the correct, colorful fish and the pumps are pumping, the plants are “just so” and you start enjoying.

You then do all the right things. Add the chemicals and things recommended and one day your pond is not as clear as it was. You cannot see your fish and worse – it’s all green! Oh no!

Well, here are some no chemicals tips
for keeping a clean pond all year round that you and your fish will love!

Fish in Pond

The first point is NEVER put any chemicals what-so-ever in your pond. They damage the environment; destroy natural vegetation and they can HARM your fish! If you are currently using chemicals, it is strongly recommend that you cease using them. At the very least, they are not safe for the environment.

Use beneficial microorganisms – always – an organic pond cleaner! Some kinds of microorganisms help us, but other kinds give us trouble. Among microorganisms, there are good bacteria and there are bad bacteria. Good bacteria cleans water, produce cheese, bread etc. and are of help to our health. Bad bacteria contaminate soil, pollute water and air. They cause sickness and disease and degrade health. So, look around. Do a little research and locate some effective microorganisms that you can use in your pond. Use organic pond cleaners, your fish will love you for it.

No Ultra Violet Lights – ever. Ultra Violet light does reduce the bacteria in the pond; however, the UV cannot tell the difference between the good bacteria and the bad ones. Because of this, a UV light kills the friendly bacteria in the pond and in any beneficial microorganisms you are using – right along with the bad guys!

Use your dechlorinator. If your water is chlorinated or every time you add fresh water to your pond; dechlorinate. Chlorine is not good for the microbes in any effective organisms you use.
Plants and animals are not likely to store chlorine. However, laboratory studies show that repeat exposure to chlorine in air can affect the immune system, the blood, the heart, and the respiratory system of animals. Chlorine causes environmental harm at low levels. Chlorine is especially harmful to organisms living in water and in soil; so, use your de-chlorination products!

No sludge build-up! When beneficial microorganisms are used regularly in ponds, about every 6 weeks or so all-year-round, the black, stinky, smelly sludge build up on the bottom of ponds does not seem to happen.

Good practice:Some good practices when dealing with ponds are:

  1. Calculate the gallons of water in your pond correctly. Use a calculator – The formula is: length x width x average depth x 7.5. This ensures that whatever you are adding to it is being added correctly to your pond.
  2. If you have heavy rains, double the dosage of whatever effective microorganisms you are use.
  3. Do not fertilize your pond plants. This also fertilizes the algae – and we do not want to be doing that!

Using beneficial microorganisms, at the recommended dosages, all-year-round (every 6 weeks or so) and keeping your pond dechlorinated whenever you add fresh water, will give you:

  • Happy fish
  • Thriving and beautiful plants
  • No green water
  • A clean, healthy, beautiful pond all-year-round!

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Clifford Woods is the CEO of Effective Environmental Services and Organic Environmental Technology.

Find out more about the beneficial microorganisms in Pond Magician

We brew Beneficial Microorganisms that eat toxins and offer Environmentally Friendly products

Natural Odor Control With Beneficial Microorganisms

Natural Odor Control With Beneficial Microorganisms

by Clifford Woods

From livestock farms, commercial establishments to homes, bad odor is a common problem. Instead of masking the smell, it’s more important that the very source of such bad odors is completely eliminated. Odor control with Beneficial Microorganisms is something that can provide a rapid solution. It’s also an approach that is cost-effective and friendly to the environment. As beneficial microorganisms do not contain any harmful chemical, using it won’t hurt humans, animals, plants or the environment.

Beneficial Microorganisms are made up of millions of friendly bacteria. Basically, what they do is eat up microbes that are responsible for the unpleasant smell detected by ones nose. When BM comes into contact with the source of bad smells, the problem is eradicated. In short, it is gone and does not require constant covering up.

Some of the beneficial microorganism bacteria can thrive even in environments where there is little or no oxygen present. Because of this, beneficial microorganisms are very effective no matter what the condition is. Other than being more affordable compared to other deodorizing solutions, the application is also very simple. Spray it where needed or pour it onto the source straight from the bottle.

Odor Control with Beneficial MicroorganismsIt works in an entirely different way than your usual deodorizer. Instead of covering up the smell with fancy fragrances, friendly bacteria present eliminate the microbes causing the problem. Furthermore, BM helps in speeding up the decomposition of the material which releases the stench into the air. But the benefits offered by this approach don’t stop there. Pathogens present which can spread diseases are also prevented from thriving in a beneficial microorganism rich environment.

Without relying on harmful chemicals, the planet can stay healthy and natural. BM contains nothing that cannot be found naturally in the environment. Do take note that it’s not something that is chemically synthesized or genetically modified. The friendly bacteria present are cultured ones that won’t damage or harm anything, except for the microbes causing the bad odors.

Beneficial microorganisms are capable of eliminating all sorts of odors, including ammonia and hydrogen sulfide.

It also doesn’t matter if the problem is indoors or outdoors. Thanks to the regenerative bacteria that enhance the power of each other, the effect of BM can be long-lasting too. Livestock farmers use BM to effectively get rid of the stench in the enclosures for their animals. More and more composting facilities and waste water treatment plants choose to go the natural way. Medical facilities, restaurants and other commercial establishments rely on it for both the deodorizing and sanitizing benefits offered. Home-owners who like a deodorizing solution that is friendly to the environment and pocket book go for Beneficial Microorganisms.

It may be applied on any type of surfaces, from concrete to fabrics. Because it’s not harmful to humans, it’s perfect for use in the kitchen or wherever bad odors and stench can be found in the home, inside or out. It’s also safe for use in areas where pets are kept, offering rapid and long-lasting odor elimination.

Odor control with Beneficial Microorganisms (BM) is a solution that is completely organic. It’s the perfect way to eliminate nasty odors as well as speed up the decomposition of its source, but without harming the environment. As a proof that it’s 100% organic and safe, it’s also being used by agricultural industry to enhance soil quality, as well as for food fermentation.

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Clifford Woods is the CEO of Effective Environmental Services and Organic Environmental Technology.

Find out more about Organic Odor Control

We brew Beneficial Microorganisms that eat toxins and offer Environmentally Friendly products

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